Jul 162012
 

It is very easy, when writing in a second language, to worry about communicating your ideas in accurate language. What very often happens is that students focus on this, but then they forget to connect the ideas. As a result, they write lots of short sentences that don’t appear to have any logical connection with each other.

We learn to connect ideas when we are beginners. The three main ways of connecting ideas are:

Contrast: It is hot, but I am wearing a winter coat.

Emphasis: I am tired and I am hungry.

Cause and effect: I wanted to eat, so I bought a sandwich.

Of course, these are very simple words; we can use alternative, more formal linkers to connect our ideas in appropriately formal, academic English.

Look at these examples:

Contrast: Although it is hot, I am wearing a winter coat.
It is hot. Nevertheless, I am wearing a winter coat.
It is hot. However, I am wearing a winter coat.
Despite the fact that it is hot, I am wearing a winter coat.
Despite the heat, I am wearing a winter coat.

Emphasis: I am tired. In addition, I am hungry.
I am tired. What is more, I am hungry.
I am tired. Additionally, I am hungry.

Cause and effect: I wanted to eat. Consequently, I bought a sandwich.
I wanted to eat. Therefore, I bought a sandwich.
I wanted to eat. As a result, I bought a sandwich.

Important! Note how these linkers use a comma after them, and sometimes you have to change the word order.

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)